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Security Levels and Opt-In PvP

Bob
EE 12 introduces three distinct security levels (High, Medium and Low) that are set on a per-hex basis. These give you much more control over the amount of PvP you're subject to by limiting the ability of other players to attack you (or for you to attack them) until you make choices that open you up to more PvP, such as entering a hex with lower security or joining a company (which subjects you to feuds). They also give territory owners much more control over the amount of PvP allowed in their territory outside of feuds and other sanctioned PvP.

In High Security hexes, only players who are feuding you or are otherwise flagged for PvP (i.e. one player attacked another in a lower-security hex and then got chased here) will appear as enemies, allowing you to attack and damage them, and you won't take reputation penalties for doing so. All other players will appear as friendly, so you won't be able to attack or damage them. This means you're generally safe from random attack in these hexes, unless you're being feuded.

In Medium Security hexes, players who are feuding you or are otherwise flagged for PvP will appear as enemies, and you can attack and damage them without taking reputation penalties. Other unallied players (not members of the same party, settlement or alliance) will appear as neutral, allowing you to attack and damage them, but you will take reputation penalties for doing so. The remaining allied players will appear as friendly, so you won't be able to attack or damage them. This means you're relatively safe from random attack in these hexes, since there are penalties for doing so, but there's always a chance a neutral character will decide it's worth the cost.

In Low Security hexes, only allied players who are neither feuding you nor otherwise flagged for PvP will appear as friendly, blocking you from attacking them or damaging them. All other players will appear either as neutral or as enemies, and you can attack and damage any of them without reputation penalties. This means you're only really safe around your allies in these hexes, as any other player is free to attack you without any penalties.

By default, hexes are set the to following security settings based on their type:

  • High: NPC, NPC Settlement, Tutorial Monster and Thornkeep hexes.
  • Medium: Wild and Player Settlement hexes.
  • Low: Monster, Home and Badlands hexes.

Player settlements can set the default security level for all hexes owned by that settlement and its banner companies. This value can be edited on the Settlement Access window where settlements set how much access other players have to that settlement's facilities. The default value is Medium, and any changes take effect during Daily Maintenance the following Monday.

Companies can set the security level for specific hexes on the Holding Management window, with changes taking effect during the next Daily Maintenance. The default value is Default, which will leave the security level based on either that set for the company's settlement (if applicable) or the hex type. Any other setting (Hi, Medium or Low) will set the hex to that Security Level for any day that the Holding is active when returning from Daily Maintenance.

On login, the security level for your current hex is displayed in the chat window. You can also view the security setting for your current hex at any time by hovering over the hex type icon on the side of the mini-map. If you transition to a new hex with a different security setting, you'll also see some text over your head letting you know you're moving from one security level to another.

There will likely be some oddities around hex borders, particularly if one player is officially in one hex and the other player is in another hex with a different security level. We think most such situations will play out in reasonable ways, but we'll keep an eye out for problems and fix them along the way. In general, if you're depending on a hex's security level to protect you, it will be safest to stay away from the edge of a hex with a lower security level.
Paddy Fitzpatrick
I like it. Now law and chaos can have some kind of meaning in the land.
Paddy Fitzpatrick - Rí Ruírec of Fianna, roaming bands of noble warriors!
Member of Aragon Alliance and home of bandits, privateers, and anyone looking to get away from the shackles of law.
Find us on PFO Discord
Stilachio Thrax
I like it too. This will help differentiate settlements more.
Virtus et Honor

Steward of Ozem's Vigil, Lord Commander of the Argyraspides Iomedais
Duffy Swiftshadow
Not as interesting or robust as I was hoping, but it's something in the right direction. Unfortunately I have a strange feeling this will barely matter politically in this form unless we find some workarounds to utilize. I'll extrapolate more when we see the details of the alliance and blacklist stuff.
Flari-Merchant
Bravo! A great step and much more than I expected for a first step! There will still be plenty of opportunity in monster hexes. There will still be those that choose to leave the security lower than high(I assume for their own freedoms).
Best of all maybe? The area that bandits have to roam looking for "customers" is less than "The Whole Map". Players that want to gather in peace will have that freedom, in SOME places. Feuds are still an option for a few days of raiding anyone.

Thank You for the details Bob! smile
Hobson Fiffledown
Shield hexes? Roads and unclaimed settlements, are they high or medium?
This space for rent.
Fiery
Shield hexes are npc hexes, hobson, so he said they are high be default.
Hobson Fiffledown
So, say me and my (currently not feuded) merry band of n'ere-do-wells want to go ransack a T3 hex somewhere. We can travel safely along roads, npc hexes, and any High security hexes to get there, hop into the T3 hex (sometimes directly) to strip mine, boss kill, or PvP, and then hop right out to relative safety? Am I understanding that correctly?
This space for rent.
Duffy Swiftshadow
Hobson Fiffledown
So, say me and my (currently not feuded) merry band of n'ere-do-wells want to go ransack a T3 hex somewhere. We can travel safely along roads, npc hexes, and any High security hexes to get there, hop into the T3 hex (sometimes directly) to strip mine, boss kill, or PvP, and then hop right out to relative safety? Am I understanding that correctly?

Assuming you are not still flagged when you bail to the NPC High Security hex then yes you can leave in safety. If you are flagged it sounds like you need to wait for that to run out to be safe in NPC hexes.
Flari-Merchant
Duffy Swiftshadow
Hobson Fiffledown
So, say me and my (currently not feuded) merry band of n'ere-do-wells want to go ransack a T3 hex somewhere. We can travel safely along roads, npc hexes, and any High security hexes to get there, hop into the T3 hex (sometimes directly) to strip mine, boss kill, or PvP, and then hop right out to relative safety? Am I understanding that correctly?

Assuming you are not still flagged when you bail to the NPC High Security hex then yes you can leave in safety. If you are flagged it sounds like you need to wait for that to run out to be safe in NPC hexes.
Can someone chasing you and hitting occasionally keep you flagged?
If so, then it is all just about same as before, sans the penalties for starting a ruckus outside of Feuds. IMO anyway.

What I mean is that such persons usually get away if there is no PVP involved already anyway. Not that the changes are bad. So far I am a fan of them. smile
 
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