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Enchantments

Edam
Bob
So, funny story, it turns out that Wright not having the %-sign after the Regeneration number doesn't mean it adds that number of Hit Points each tick, it just means that Wright has a typo in and doesn't give any bonus to Regeneration. I'll be fixing that for EE 16 by putting the %-sign in.

Always thought Wright was sub par as a combat armor but did not have enough evidence to bother mentioning it.
Smitty
You still haven't acknowledged keen giving you increased affliction with sickening critical - that seems to be the strongest addition of affliction you can add 44 afflcited each critical hit- at rank 5 seems pretty beefy - shrug.

..

Afflicted on a crit is nice providing you can crit, not always easy against ninjas. However bleeding when flat footed (which is pretty much all the time for rogue types) is clearly better. A 50% chance of extra burning when already burning by cross classing wizard is even better.

Afflicted is the hardest to put on but also seems the most effective stack of the three so that may well be working as intended.
Smitty
Bob
Bob
Smitty
Cool was thinking it could of also worked light the wright armor -
Which unlike healer armor just adds a # of HP each tick - 140 HP each tick didn’t seem out of this world - 140% just seemed like a bit much ..

That could also work, and may turn out to be necessary if the percentages get rounded off too much. We'll just have to try it out and make sure each upgrade of the enchantment is noticeably more effective.

So, funny story, it turns out that Wright not having the %-sign after the Regeneration number doesn't mean it adds that number of Hit Points each tick, it just means that Wright has a typo in and doesn't give any bonus to Regeneration. I'll be fixing that for EE 16 by putting the %-sign in.
Since wright is actually a % as well .. and just HP aren’t added -

Looking at the regeneration again -
And extra 1.4 % for T3 +5 item feels really low- ( regeneration the effect is 10%)
Regeneration +[.1 + (ItemPlus * .05)]%
Regeneration +[.2 + (ItemPlus * .1)]%
Regeneration +[.4 + (ItemPlus * .2)]%
This looks like it should be
Regeneration +[ 1 + (ItemPlus * .05)]%
Regeneration +[2 + (ItemPlus * 1)]%
Regeneration +[4 + (ItemPlus * 2)]%
So T1 regen would for a +3 item would be ? 1+1.5 = 2.5 %
T2 +3 would be 2+ 3 = 5%
T3+3 would be 4+ 6 = 10 %

That appears to be closer to the intended numbers that would be used - of course a T3 +5 item would be 4 +10 = 14% and if that person wears healer armor ( maxed) - and this stuff stacks … that is what 26% ??
Think those numbers look completely reasonable until it stacks with other forms or regeneration
- If it is only a <1 % to max 1.4% bump - I don’t think anyone will use it - - can only use so many items - there are some better choices laying around.
Bob
Smitty
If it is only a <1 % to max 1.4% bump - I don’t think anyone will use it - - can only use so many items - there are some better choices laying around.

A lot depends on your circumstances. The more hit points you have, and the longer you tend to stay in combat, the more valuable even small amounts of regeneration are. The current numbers make regeneration a pretty good choice for players with very high hit points, little other access to regeneration bonuses, good access to other defense bonuses, and a tendency to stay in combat for over a minute. Other enchantments definitely work out better for characters who don't fit that description, but there are at least some reasonable circumstances where regeneration is currently the best choice.

That said, I think the numbers might be a little low, in that you have to have very high hit points and stick to very extended combat before regeneration enchantments are dependably better than the alternatives. I'll run the math for a variety of circumstances and see if a small boost is in order, but I don't think the numbers here should be in the same range as the various feats offering regeneration bonuses. Those feats trade off regeneration for other big bonuses that also generally aren't available in the same numbers as enchantments.

Nactillius
So are the mechanics of using the enchantment recipes figured out yet? Who uses the recipes and how does spellcraft relate? For example, to make a pouch of holding, will it require a leatherworker with a particular level of spellcraft to add the holding to a pouch?
Bob
Nactillius
So are the mechanics of using the enchantment recipes figured out yet? Who uses the recipes and how does spellcraft relate? For example, to make a pouch of holding, will it require a leatherworker with a particular level of spellcraft to add the holding to a pouch?

The short version is that a leatherworker makes Small Leather Pouches +2, then a spellcrafter turns those into Lesser Small Leather Pouches of Holding +2. The spellcrafter doesn't need to also know leatherworking.

For the longer version, here's what was posted a few months ago, which is still basically what we're working from:

Bob
Enchanting recipes (which will require ranks in Spellcrafting and will be added to the standard recipe loot drops) will use a single item from their Valid Enchant Groups as their first ingredient, and the result will be an enchanted version of that specific item. The first ingredient will not count as part of the standard calculation for the final plus of the output, but will limit the final plus of the output. In other words, enchanting a +4 item to a +3 enchanted item would require the same additional ingredients as enchanting a +3 item to a +3 enchanted item, but you can't enchant a +3 item to a +4 enchanted item.

Enchanting recipes will use up to 3 other ingredients. The first of those ingredients will be one or more crystals, like those used in the recipes for various charges. The other ingredients will be refined largely from rare raw materials obtained through a mix of gathering (each raw material restricted to a single small area of the map, no gushers allowed) and looting (each item restricted to a single escalation). The final plus of the enchantment will be calculated in the standard way but based purely on those 1-3 additional ingredients, and again limited by the plus of the item being enchanted.

Azoth can be used in the usual way to increase an enchanted item's plus, but again no higher than the plus of the item being enchanted.
Bringslite
@ Bob
Can you give us an idea about crafting times for these items? Will it take 45 (just an example) days to craft T3 armor AND (combined) enchant it to finished Enchanted Armor?

Thanks for what you can share!
Virtute et Armis
-Unknown
Bob
Bringslite
Can you give us an idea about crafting times for these items? Will it take 45 (just an example) days to craft T3 armor AND (combined) enchant it to finished Enchanted Armor?

Haven't put much thought into that aspect yet, so I guess I'll just think aloud here. If I follow the standard formulas for refining and crafting, based on item quality and the target values for the ingredients, then the enchanting times probably would be somewhat similar to the crafting times, possibly ranging from half to twice as long depending on the specifics.

However, I suspect the enchanting times need to be artificially lowered. In part that's because, at least for weapons and armor, they don't really double the value of the item in terms of effectiveness. For general wearable items, they might actually increase the value that much, so in those cases extra time could be a little more justified.

The other issue is that enchanting shouldn't take so long that we need an army of enchanters to keep up with the output from multiple crafters. Not everything should get enchanted, but certainly a fair percentage should be. At a rough guess, based on the percentages of recipes each crafter-type has for enchantable items, if you had one of each standard crafter, you'd have the equivalent of 6.5 crafters putting out enchantable items. To keep up with 100% of that output, you'd need 6.5 spellcrafters if the spellcrafting recipes averaged out to the same enchanting time as the crafting time. So, if it took about 1/6 as long (on average) to enchant as to craft, we'd need about as many spellcrafters as standard crafters to enchant almost all the items produced. Assuming I'm mathing properly here, that also means that making enchanting time 1/4 that of crafting time would mean that, with the same number of spellcrafters as other individual crafters, about 2/3 of enchantable items would probably get enchanted.

That sounds roughly feasible to me, and implies each enchantment adds roughly 25% to the item's effectiveness. With some fiddling, I could bias that to lower the time more on armors and weapons and not lower it as much for typical wearable items, which are already quicker in general and where the enchantment adds a greater percentage of value.

Thoughts?
Edam
My thoughts ?

Enchanting is a great example of why high level crafters need more than one craft queue eventually, even if they have to train an XP-expensive feat to get access. Most of your high level spellcrafters will also have a main int based craft and be happily producing T3 spellbooks or whatever with no time to spellcraft.
Bob
Edam
Enchanting is a great example of why high level crafters need more than one craft queue eventually, even if they have to train an XP-expensive feat to get access. Most of your high level spellcrafters will also have a main int based craft and be happily producing T3 spellbooks or whatever with no time to spellcraft.

I think enchanting will be very much in demand, and able to compete well against other possible crafting choices. That said, time is money, so if the enchanting times are too far off from reflecting an enchantment's value, then crafters will certainly have an incentive for choosing other projects instead. The dynamic nature of the economy will help with that, since then players will simply start paying more for their enchantments until things balance out, but the end result would still be less enchantment going on than desired if things are too far out of whack.

Extra queues can help, and are still something we plan to look into, but then again the same character could just craft twice as many T3 spellbooks if the queues don't have restrictions of some kind to prevent that.
Azure_Zero
Can we get enchantments to use Tokens as an ingredient for them, as that would help in emptying the T1 token reserves everyone has….
 
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